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August 20, 2012

AlertRocket Keeps Gamers Engaged and Connected


Online gaming for many is a deeply immersive experience that offers its users a chance to be a completely different person for a while. As such, users don't much care for having that experience interrupted by alerts and notifications provided by the game itself. That’s where Notice Software comes in, as the company looks to help gamers better withstand these often necessary interruptions to their favorite pastime via the new AlertRocket Native-Push system.

AlertRocket's Native-Push technology is rapidly making appearances in several games, and on several devices. For instance, Epic Games was spotted using Native-Push with its popular Infinity Blade II in a bid to get its ClashMob events together. The ClashMob events allow users to engage other users in social or community events and then in turn earn rewards for their efforts.

But it's not just gaming that Native-Push can be used with; AlertRocket's systems can work with RSS feeds, via the push notification API, or even manually through the user interface. Native-Push is currently operating on two major platforms—Android and iOS—as well as the platform hoping to be the third major platform, Windows Phone (News - Alert). Native-Push also includes single-send to APNS, C2DM and GCM, auto-managed feedback systems, both tagged and aliased registrations and sending alike, auto-send from RSS and scheduled push systems.

AlertRocket's CEO, Burton Miller, described Native-Push as a way to "connect(s) your app to your users - even when they are not using it" by supplying users with messages relating to the app much like Infinity Blade II did. Additionally, AlertRocket offers the Web-Push system, which is like Native-Push but specifically geared toward the mobile Web. With Web-Push, publishers can funnel content to specific users and help drive traffic by delivering just the content that users want, all without needing to develop a mobile app specifically to allow Native-Push into play.

Admittedly, breaking the immersion factor of games doesn't seem like a great way to get users more engaged, but offering special incentives for gamers to do so makes much more sense. Hence, this then allows for more overall connection, and more overall willingness to work with an app's notifications. The ease of use and rapid start capabilities should also make it more attractive to both publishers and users’ alike, allowing publishers to get the word out about new possibilities involved with games and other applications much more rapidly, as well as give those interested users more reason to work with that new content.

Getting word out to users isn't always easy, but both Native-Push and Web-Push should go a long way towards providing that word in a fashion that gamers and Web-users alike can live and work with.

Want to learn more about the latest in communications and technology? Then be sure to attend ITEXPO West 2012, taking place Oct. 2-5, in Austin, TX.  Stay in touch with everything happening at ITEXPO (News - Alert). Follow us on Twitter.




Edited by Jamie Epstein
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